God Laughs at His Enemies

I started a new morning routine now that school is over. I decided to work my way through Psalms using Spurgeon’s “Treasury of David”. Here is part of the second Psalm:

Ps 2:1-6 Why do the nations rage, And the people plot a vain thing? 2 The kings of the earth set themselves, And the rulers take counsel together, Against the Lord and against His Anointed, saying, 3 “Let us break Their bonds in pieces And cast away Their cords from us.”4 He who sits in the heavens shall laugh; The Lord shall hold them in derision. 5 Then He shall speak to them in His wrath, And distress them in His deep displeasure: 6 “Yet I have set My King On My holy hill of Zion.” NKJV

Here is a quote that Spurgeon used:

It is easy for God to destroy his foes. . . . .  Behold Pharaoh, his wise men, his hosts, and his horses plouting and plunging, and sinking like lead in the Red sea.  Here is the end of one of the greatest plots ever formed against God’s chosen.  Of thirty Roman emperors, governors of provinces, and others high in office, who distinguished themselves by their zeal and bitterness in persecuting the early Christians, one became speedily deranged after some atrocious cruelty, one was slain by his own son, one became blind, the eyes of one started out of his head, one was drowned, one was strangled, one died in a miserable captivity, one fell dead in a manner that will not bear recital, one died of so loathsome a disease that several of his physicians were put to death because they could not abide the stench that filled his room, two committed suicide, a third attempted it, but had to call for help to finish the work, five were assassinated by their own people or servants, five others died the most miserable and excruciating deaths, several of them having an untold complication of diseases, and eight were killed in battle, or after being taken prisoners.  Among these was Julian the apostate.  In the days of his prosperity he is said to have pointed his dagger to heaven defying the Son of God, whom he commonly called the Galilean.  But when he was wounded in battle, he saw that all was over with him, and he gathered up his clotted blood, and threw it into the air, exclaiming, “Thou hast conquered, O thou Galilean.”  Voltaire has told us of the agonies of Charles IX. of France, which drove the blood through the pores of the skin of that miserable monarch, after his cruelties and treachery to the Hugenots. William S. Plumer, D.D., L.L.D., 1867.

I know there is a spiritual war going on and sometimes with the eyes of the flesh I despair; but in the end I know what happens: Every knee shall bow and every tongue confess; that Jesus is Lord; it can be a moment of joy or a moment of the most abject terror known to a human being.

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About hansston

Pastor a church in Sparta.
This entry was posted in Biblical, Illustrations and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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